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Foods of Puri

Puri being a pilgrim city mostly offers pure vegetarian food in its restaurants. One can have local Oriya cuisine as well as South-Indian delicacies. The city is also known for a lip-smacking Chinese cuisine that one must try. Other than this, being in Puri, on must experience food from the Jagannath Temple which is known for having largest kitchen in the world and the enthralling setup serves simple yet delicious food.

Abadha:  An Abadha Thali is served at the Puri Temple which comprises of all the dishes from the Mahaprashad that is served to Lord Jagannath at the Temple. The thali is priced between INR 70 – 120 and includes most varieties of local cuisine of Puri. One needs to go and have the Abadha that is served at the Temple as well as in Anand Bazaar to experience the local food in Puri at its best.

Nirmalya: Besides Sankudi and Sukhila mahaprasad another type of dry mahaprasad is Nirmalya. This is also known as Kaibalya. In spiritual recognition Nirmalya is equally important as Mahaprasad. There is a belief among Hindus that if Nirmalya is given to a person on his death bed, he is certain to find a place for himself in the heaven after his death following atonement of all his sins. Nirmalya is commonly understood as dry-rice i.e. rice dried up in hot sun in Kaibalya Baikuntha. As laid down in the Skanda Purana things like flowers, sandal paste, garlands, etc. which are treated with reverence on the Lord including the other divine deities seated on Ratnasinmhasan (throne) in the temple are also known as Nirmalya after they are taken out from the deities. It is thus established that any of the divine accompaniments or components that is taken out of the Lord and his divine associates is known as Nirmalya.

Khaja:  Khajjaka, plain or sweet mentioned in Manasollasa, was a wheat flour preparation fried in ghee. Khaja is believed to have originated from the eastern parts of the former state of Oudh and the former United Provinces of Agra and Oudh. This area presently corresponds to eastern districts of Uttar Pradesh and Western districts of Bihar. and is also popular in the neighboring states of West Bengal and Odisha as well as regions like Kutch and Andhra Pradesh. Refined wheat flour with sugar is made into layered dough, with or without dry fruit or other stuffing, and lightly fried in oil to make khaja. It is one of the very famous sweets of Odisha and is related to emotions of all Odia people. It is also offered as an offering in the Jagannath Temple, Puri.

Khechedi: A twist in the Indian Khichdi, Khicede is a famous Odia dish served at the Puri Temple as a part of the maha bhog made to Lord Jagannath. This dish is prepared from a mix of rice and lentils cooked in pure ghee, such that it is equal parts delicious and healthy. To add flavour to the food, coconut, sugar, and cinnamon, are added to this food in Puri. This dish is served alongside papad and curd to complete a meal for a person.

Dalma:  A city-special, Dalma became so popular Dr A.P.J. Abdul Kalam added it to the President’s food menu. Dalma, cooked as a mix of lentils and vegetables, tastes surprisingly good. There is a restaurant in Puri named after this famous dish itself, Dalma, located on VIP Road that promises to serve all travellers with what it knows best: local Odia cuisine. One must visit this restaurant to try out the authentic food in Puri.

Ukhuda: Lia (Odia: ଲିଆ) (fried paddy) is a prepared food from rice mainly consumed in the region of Odisha, India. The other varieties are Khai (Odia: ଖଇ) (fried paddy) and Ukhuda (Odia: ଉଖୁଡ଼ା) (fried paddy sweetened by jaggery). It is a form of puffed rice (Rice puffs while roasting it with heated sand) which is added with jaggery syrup. “Kora khai”, a derived food from “khai” is offered to Lingaraja in Lingaraja temple, Bhubaneswar.

Rasabali: (Odia: ରସାବଳୀ, IAST: rasābaḷi) is a sweet dish from Odisha, India. Rasabali is offered to Baladevjew, and originated in the Baladevjew Temple of Kendrapara. It is one of the Chapana bhoga of Jagannath temple.

It consists of deep fried flattened reddish brown patties of chhena (farmer cheese) that are soaked in thickened, sweetened milk (rabri). Flattening the chhena into palm-sized patties is done in order to allow them to absorb the milk more readily. The thickened milk is also usually lightly seasoned with crushed cardamoms.

Rabidi: (IAST: Rabaḍī) is a sweet, condensed-milk-based dish, originating from the Indian subcontinent, made by boiling the milk on low heat for a long time until it becomes dense and changes its color to off-white or pale yellow. Sugar, spices and nuts are added to it to give it flavor. It is chilled and served as dessert. Rabri is the main ingredient in several desserts, such as rasabali, chhena kheeri, and khira sagara. Hathras is famous for Rabri and other sweets prepared from ghee. A similar dish goes by the name Basundi.

Traditional Indian ice cream kulfi served with sweet rabri and rose petal jam gulkand.
A fusion food derived from the traditional Rabdi from Indian cuisine addressed as Suvarna Rabdi. Use pumpkin to give it a gold-like or Suvarna shade and garnish with vanilla seeds.

Chenna Poda:  (transl. Burned cheese) is a cheese dessert from the Indian state of Odisha. Chhena poda literally means Roasted Cheese in Odia. It is made of well-kneaded homemade fresh cheese chhena, sugar is baked for several hours until it browns. Chhena poda is the only well known Indian dessert whose flavor is predominantly derived from the caramelization of sugar.

Chhena poda is usually made at home during traditional festivals in Odisha, such as Durga Puja. It is also served in small traditional roadside stalls and confectioneries throughout the state along with other delicacies such as rasagolla. Since the mid-1980s, it has gradually found its place in restaurant menus across Odisha. Odisha Milk Federation is investing heavily in mass-producing and popularizing this delicacy, determined not to let this happen again.

Macha Chenncheda: Another seafood dish, Macha Chenncheda, is famous across the town of Puri because of its aromatic deliciousness that calls to travellers all around the globe. This food in Puri is cooked with fish, vegetables, chana dal and bananas. Nobody could ever think to bring these ingredients together in a single dish, but this Odia dish has done so and oh, how tastefully even. This dish is best served with rice on the side but can also be enjoyed with rotis.

Sea Food:  Another seafood dish, Macha Chenncheda, is famous across the town of Puri because of its aromatic deliciousness that calls to travellers all around the globe. This food in Puri is cooked with fish, vegetables, chana dal and bananas. Nobody could ever think to bring these ingredients together in a single dish, but this Odia dish has done so and oh, how tastefully even. This dish is best served with rice on the side but can also be enjoyed with rotis.

eafood is any form of sea life regarded as food by humans, prominently including fish and shellfish. Shellfish include various species of molluscs (e.g. bivalve molluscs such as clams, oysters, and mussels and cephalopods such as octopus and squid), crustaceans (e.g. shrimp, crabs, and lobster), and echinoderms (e.g. sea urchins). Historically, marine mammals such as cetaceans (whales and dolphins) as well as seals have been eaten as food, though that happens to a lesser extent in modern times. Edible sea plants such as some seaweeds and microalgae are widely eaten as sea vegetables around the world, especially in Asia. In North America, although not generally in the United Kingdom, the term “seafood” is extended to fresh water organisms eaten by humans, so all edible aquatic life may be referred to as “seafood”.[citation needed] For the sake of completeness, this article is inclusive of all edible aquatic life.

Chungdi Malai: Puri’s location on the Bay of Bengal makes it an ideal place for any seafood dish. Chungdi Malai, a delicious prawn dish that has a creamier texture because of the use of coconut milk during its cooking. Spices are then added to this smoother texture to make it a lip-smacking favourite food in Puri. This unique dish is then served with basmati rice, which makes for a satisfying and full-filing meal for one.

Preparation: The hard shells of the prawns are removed and marinated. The prawns are then fried in hot oil along with onion, ginger, garlic, and stirred with turmeric and sugar and salt and coconut milk for a few minutes.